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Photo taken on Sept. 12, 2020 shows cultural conservationists reinforcing ruins of three rooms at the site of ancient Loulan in the wilderness of Ruoqiang County, northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. (Northwest Research Institute Co., Ltd. of CREC/Handout via Xinhua)


URUMQI, Dec. 4 (Xinhua) -- China's cultural conservationists have completed emergency repair works on the ground remains believed to be ruins of the ancient Loulan kingdom in Xinjiang.

Loulan was a prosperous settlement built around 2,000 years ago to serve traders transiting through the ancient Silk Road. However, with time, references to Loulan mysteriously disappeared. The site is today located in the wilderness of southern Xinjiang's Ruoqiang County.

In 2019, conservationists found that the foundations of a pagoda and three houses unearthed in the ruins had collapsed to various extents. The structures were marred by cracks, holes and erosion.

The repair works that began in June this year consolidated ground structures of the three houses and the pagoda ruins.

Photo taken on Oct. 20, 2020 shows a member of cultural relics protection staff creating digital file with a 3D laser scanner for ruins of a pagoda at the site of ancient Loulan in the wilderness of Ruoqiang County, northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. (Northwest Research Institute Co., Ltd. of CREC/Handout via Xinhua)

In this combo photo, the upper half taken on Nov. 11, 2019 shows part of ruins of a pagoda before a reinforcement project at the site of ancient Loulan in the wilderness of Ruoqiang County, northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region; the lower half taken on Oct. 20, 2020 shows the same part of the pagoda after the reinforcement project. (Northwest Research Institute Co., Ltd. of CREC/Handout via Xinhua)

The square-shaped settlement has city walls, each measuring about 330 meters in length, with the pagoda built in the northeast corner. The house foundations are located in the west of the city ruins.

Archeologists believe the settlement was one of the capitals established by the Kingdom of Loulan, which was relocated several times due to changes in water resources, natural disasters, widespread diseases, or wars. It had disappeared completely by the Tang Dynasty (618-907).

The ruins of the mysterious city were discovered first by Swedish adventurer Sven Hedin in 1901.

Over the years, archeologists have discovered a large number of relics, such as the Han Dynasty (202 B.C.-220 A.D.) coins, bronze and lacquer wares and silk from the site.

In this combo photo, the upper half taken on Nov. 14, 2019 shows part of ruins of a pagoda before a reinforcement project at the site of ancient Loulan in the wilderness of Ruoqiang County, northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region; the lower half taken on Oct. 20, 2020 shows the same part of the pagoda after the reinforcement project. (Northwest Research Institute Co., Ltd. of CREC/Handout via Xinhua)

In this combo photo, the upper half taken on Nov. 14, 2019 shows part of ruins of three rooms before a reinforcement project at the site of ancient Loulan in the wilderness of Ruoqiang County, northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region; the lower half taken on Oct. 20, 2020 shows the same part of three rooms after the reinforcement project. (Northwest Research Institute Co., Ltd. of CREC/Handout via Xinhua)■

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